Dr Stanley Rosenberg

Stan Rosenberg founded and directs Scholarship and Christianity in Oxford (SCIO).  He is an academic member of Wycliffe Hall and a member of the Faculty of Theology and Religion at the University of Oxford, teaching early Christian history and doctrine and working in particular with postgraduate students.  His research and teaching interests focus on Augustine’s works, early Christian cosmology and its relationship to Greco–Roman science, culture and philosophy, and the interplay between intellectual and popular thought in this period. He is also involved in discussions on the relationship between science and religion.  Recent research has led to articles on early Christianity and Greco-Roman science, and the intersection of preaching, popular religion, and the development of doctrine in late antiquity.  

Dr Rosenberg is the UK Regional Advisor for the Museum of the Bible Scholars Initiative, directs the Logos in Oxford programme serving student scholars working on Museum artefacts and consulted extensively on the presentation of the displays in the Museum.  Actively involved in broader science and religion discussions, he has produced the Oxford and the US tours of the play, Mr Darwin's Tree, and is the general editor (and author of a chapter on which this lecture is based) of Finding Ourselves after Darwin: Conversations about the Image of God, Original Sin and the Problem of Evil, Baker Academic, 2018.  Since 2002 he has directed or co-directed multiple science and religion projects in Oxford funded by the John Templeton Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Blankemeyer Foundation, and the BioLogos Foundation.  He is on the advisory councils of the BioLogos Foundation and the Museum of the Bible, advising the latter on science and the Bible, and patristics.  

He is married to Joy, who is a consultant clinical audiological scientist working for the national school for the deaf; born and educated in the US, they are dual nationals and have lived in Oxford since 1999 with their two children, one in A levels and the other a recent university graduate.